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34 Black-and-white Birds in Texas

black-and-white birds in texas
Black-throated Sparrow in Val Verde, Texas: Photo by Bryan Calk

Introduction

Texas boasts a rich avian diversity, with numerous black-and-white bird species gracing its skies and landscapes. In this comprehensive guide, we’ll delve into the captivating world of these striking birds, exploring their unique characteristics, behaviors, habitats, and conservation status.

Ring-necked Duck (Aythya collaris)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Jonathan Taffet
  • Features: The ring-necked duck showcases striking black-and-white plumage, with a distinctive chestnut ring around the neck of males.
  • Behavior: These diving ducks are adept at foraging underwater for aquatic plants and invertebrates.
  • Habitat: Ring-necked ducks prefer freshwater lakes, ponds, and marshes, particularly during the winter months.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Despite their name, the chestnut ring around the neck of male ring-necked ducks is often challenging to discern in the field.

Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Andy Liu
  • Features: Slightly smaller than the ring-necked duck, the lesser scaup exhibits a rounder head and a distinctive bluish bill.
  • Behavior: Lesser scaup are proficient divers, feeding on aquatic vegetation and invertebrates beneath the water’s surface.
  • Habitat: They inhabit deeper freshwater lakes and coastal waters during the winter months, often congregating in large flocks.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Lesser scaup are highly social birds, frequently engaging in synchronized swimming and diving displays.

Greater Scaup (Aythya marila)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Dana Sudborough
  • Features: Larger than their lesser counterparts, greater scaup possess a more elongated head and a bold white wing stripe.
  • Behavior: Like lesser scaup, greater scaup are skilled divers, foraging for food in aquatic habitats.
  • Habitat: They can be found in a variety of aquatic environments, including lakes, rivers, and coastal bays.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Greater scaup are known for their distinctive courtship displays, which involve elaborate group swims and dives.

Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Jeff Osborne
  • Features: Buffleheads are small diving ducks with striking black-and-white plumage and iridescent green and purple patches on their heads.
  • Behavior: Agile divers, they hunt for small fish, crustaceans, and aquatic insects underwater.
  • Habitat: Buffleheads frequent freshwater ponds, marshes, and coastal bays, often in densely vegetated areas.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Buffleheads are renowned for their swift and erratic flight patterns, darting and weaving through the air with remarkable agility.

Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Tobias Yoder
  • Features: Easily identified by their distinctive black and white crest, hooded mergansers can raise and lower their crest at will.
  • Behavior: Proficient divers, they feed on small fish, crustaceans, and aquatic insects beneath the water’s surface.
  • Habitat: Hooded mergansers inhabit wooded ponds, rivers, and marshes, often in areas with dense vegetation.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: During courtship displays, male hooded mergansers engage in elaborate “head-throwing” displays to attract females.

Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Antonio Aguilar
  • Features: The horned grebe sports distinctive black-and-white breeding plumage, with striking golden “horns” extending from behind its eyes.
  • Behavior: A skilled swimmer and diver, the horned grebe feeds on small fish, crustaceans, and aquatic invertebrates.
  • Habitat: They inhabit freshwater lakes, ponds, and marshes during the breeding season, often favoring areas with emergent vegetation.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Horned grebes are known for their elaborate courtship displays, which involve synchronized swimming and head-bobbing movements.

Black-necked Grebe (Podiceps nigricollis)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Dana Sudborough
  • Features: Similar in appearance to the horned grebe, the black-necked grebe showcases a black-and-white plumage pattern with a distinctive black neck.
  • Behavior: These agile divers hunt for small fish, insects, and crustaceans beneath the water’s surface.
  • Habitat: They prefer shallow freshwater lakes, marshes, and reservoirs with abundant aquatic vegetation.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Black-necked grebes are known for their unusual nesting behavior, often constructing floating nests anchored to emergent vegetation.

Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Ryan Sanderson
  • Features: Long-legged and elegant, the black-necked stilt displays striking black-and-white plumage, with long, thin red legs.
  • Behavior: These waders forage in shallow water, using their long bills to probe for aquatic insects, crustaceans, and small fish.
  • Habitat: Black-necked stilts inhabit shallow wetlands, salt marshes, and mudflats along coastal areas.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Black-necked stilts are highly vocal birds, often emitting a series of yapping calls during courtship displays and territorial interactions.

American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: Easily recognizable by their long, bright orange bills and striking black-and-white plumage.
  • Behavior: American oystercatchers use their powerful bills to pry open bivalves and other shellfish along the shoreline.
  • Habitat: They frequent coastal beaches, mudflats, and rocky shores, particularly during the breeding season.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: American oystercatchers are monogamous birds, often forming long-term pair bonds with their mates.

Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Liam Huber
  • Features: During the breeding season, black-bellied plovers display a striking black belly patch, contrasting with their white underparts and gray upperparts.
  • Behavior: These shorebirds feed on small invertebrates, crustaceans, and insects along coastal beaches and mudflats.
  • Habitat: Black-bellied plovers inhabit coastal habitats, including sandy beaches, estuaries, and tidal flats.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Despite their name, black-bellied plovers are most easily identified by their distinctive black armpits in flight.

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Javi Gonzalez
  • Features: Adults have a dark gray to black back, contrasting with their white head and underparts, while juveniles exhibit more mottled plumage.
  • Behavior: Lesser black-backed gulls are opportunistic feeders, scavenging for food along coastal areas and also preying on small fish, insects, and carrion.
  • Habitat: They are typically found along coastlines, including sandy beaches, rocky shores, and coastal marshes, as well as inland lakes and rivers.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: During the breeding season, lesser black-backed gulls engage in elaborate courtship displays, including aerial acrobatics and calling.

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Juan Miguel Artigas Azas
  • Features: Known for their unique bill structure, with a lower mandible longer than the upper one, allowing them to skim the water’s surface for prey.
  • Behavior: Black skimmers feed primarily on small fish, which they catch by flying low over the water with their lower bill submerged.
  • Habitat: They inhabit coastal areas, including beaches, sandbars, and estuaries, where they nest in colonies on sandy substrates.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Black skimmers are crepuscular feeders, meaning they are most active during dawn and dusk when fish are near the surface.

Least Tern (Sternula antillarum)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Harlan Stewart
  • Features: A small tern with a white body, gray wings, and a black cap during the breeding season, often with a distinctive yellow bill.
  • Behavior: Least terns are highly agile flyers, performing intricate aerial maneuvers as they hunt for small fish along the coast.
  • Habitat: They prefer nesting on sandy beaches, sandbars, and salt flats near shallow coastal waters.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Least terns are known for their aggressive defense of nesting territories, often dive-bombing intruders to protect their nests and chicks.

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Zeno Taylord-Hawk
  • Features: Large raptors with distinctive brown and white plumage, with a wingspan reaching up to six feet.
  • Behavior: Ospreys are specialized fish hunters, plunging feet-first into the water to catch their prey with powerful talons.
  • Habitat: They inhabit coastal areas, lakeshores, and riversides, often nesting atop tall structures like utility poles and artificial platforms.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Ospreys have reversible outer toes that allow them to grasp fish with two toes in front and two behind, enhancing their hunting efficiency.

White-tailed Kite (Elanus leucurus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Steven Meisel
  • Features: Small raptors with predominantly white plumage and striking red eyes, often hovering in search of prey.
  • Behavior: White-tailed kites are agile hunters, preying primarily on small mammals, birds, and insects, which they catch in mid-air or from perches.
  • Habitat: They prefer open habitats such as grasslands, marshes, and agricultural fields, where they can hunt effectively.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: White-tailed kites are known for their hovering flight behavior, during which they remain suspended in the air with their wings beating rapidly.

White-tailed Hawk (Geranoaetus albicaudatus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Steve Wickliffe
  • Features: A large, stocky hawk with predominantly white plumage, contrasting with black wingtips and a rusty-red tail.
  • Behavior: White-tailed hawks are opportunistic hunters, preying on small mammals, reptiles, and birds, which they catch from elevated perches or during soaring flights.
  • Habitat: They inhabit open grasslands, savannas, and agricultural areas, where they can find ample prey and suitable nesting sites.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: White-tailed hawks are known for their distinctive alarm call, a series of high-pitched whistles, often heard during territorial disputes.

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: A medium-sized woodpecker with a striking black-and-white pattern on its back, complemented by a red crown and throat patch in males.
  • Behavior: Acorn woodpeckers are known for their unique behavior of storing acorns in specially drilled holes in trees, known as granaries, for future consumption.
  • Habitat: They inhabit oak woodlands and mixed forests, where they can find an abundant supply of acorns for food and suitable nesting sites.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Acorn woodpeckers exhibit complex social structures, living in large family groups that work cooperatively to defend their territory and maintain their granaries.

Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Sunil Thirkannad
  • Features: The smallest woodpecker in North America, with a black-and-white striped back, a white belly, and distinctive white spots on its wings.
  • Behavior: Downy woodpeckers forage for insects and larvae in trees, using their specialized bills to drill into bark and extract prey.
  • Habitat: They are found in various wooded habitats, including forests, woodlots, and suburban areas with mature trees.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Despite their small size, downy woodpeckers are aggressive defenders of their territories, often engaging in drumming and vocalizations to establish dominance.

Ladder-backed Woodpecker (Dryobates scalaris)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Don Danko
  • Features: A small woodpecker with barred black-and-white plumage on its back, complemented by a distinctive ladder-like pattern on its wings.
  • Behavior: Ladder-backed woodpeckers feed on insects, particularly wood-boring beetles, by pecking and probing into the bark of trees.
  • Habitat: They inhabit arid and semi-arid habitats such as deserts, scrublands, and mesquite woodlands, often utilizing cacti and other desert plants for nesting.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Ladder-backed woodpeckers are known for their rhythmic drumming patterns, which they use to communicate with mates and establish territory boundaries.

Hairy Woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Darrell Vollert
  • Features: Similar in appearance to the downy woodpecker but larger, with a longer bill and a larger white patch on the back.
  • Behavior: Hairy woodpeckers feed on insects, seeds, and sap, excavating cavities in trees with their powerful bills to access food sources.
  • Habitat: They are found in various forested habitats, including deciduous and mixed woodlands, often preferring mature trees with abundant dead wood.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Hairy woodpeckers have been known to use human-made structures such as wooden buildings and utility poles as drumming sites to communicate with other woodpeckers.

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Charles Robshaw
  • Features: A large and powerful falcon with bluish-gray plumage on its back and wings, contrasting with a white face and underparts, and distinctive black markings on its head.
  • Behavior: Peregrine falcons are known for their incredible speed and agility in flight, hunting primarily by stooping from great heights to catch birds in mid-air.
  • Habitat: They inhabit a wide range of habitats, including coastal cliffs, mountains, and urban areas, where they can find suitable nesting sites and abundant prey.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Peregrine falcons are the fastest animals on Earth, capable of reaching speeds of over 240 miles per hour during their high-speed hunting dives.

Aplomado Falcon (Falco femoralis)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Ryan Rodriguez
  • Features: A slender and graceful falcon with striking black facial markings, reddish-brown upperparts, and white underparts with distinctive black streaking.
  • Behavior: Aplomado falcons hunt small birds, mammals, and insects, using their speed and agility to pursue prey in flight or from perches.
  • Habitat: They prefer open grasslands, savannas, and desert scrublands, where they can find suitable nesting sites on cliffs or in abandoned raptor nests.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Aplomado falcons are often observed hunting cooperatively in pairs or family groups, coordinating their efforts to flush out prey and increase hunting success.

Black Phoebe (Sayornis nigricans)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: A small, stout flycatcher with black plumage on the head, back, and wings, and a contrasting white belly and undertail coverts.
  • Behavior: Black phoebes are sit-and-wait predators, perching on branches or other elevated spots near water, where they scan for flying insects to catch in mid-air.
  • Habitat: They are commonly found near water sources such as streams, ponds, and marshes, where they build their nests on cliffs, bridges, or man-made structures.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Black phoebes are named for their distinctive call, a clear, plaintive “phoebe” or “fee-bee” often repeated in series, which they use to communicate with other individuals.

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Mike Cameron
  • Features: A medium-sized flycatcher with black plumage on the head, back, and wings, and a white throat, breast, and belly, often seen perching conspicuously on wires or branches.
  • Behavior: Eastern kingbirds are aggressive defenders of their territory, often engaging in aerial displays and vocalizations to deter larger birds or predators from their nesting sites.
  • Habitat: They inhabit open woodlands, forest edges, grasslands, and urban areas, where they can find suitable perches for hunting insects and building nests.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Despite their small size, eastern kingbirds are fearless in defense of their nests, known to mob and drive away much larger birds, including hawks and crows, to protect their young.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Aaron Boone
  • Features: A striking flycatcher with long, slender tail feathers that give it its distinctive scissor-like appearance in flight, along with grayish-pink plumage on the head, back, and wings.
  • Behavior: Scissor-tailed flycatchers are highly aerial birds, often seen swooping and diving to catch flying insects in mid-air, using their long tails to help steer and maneuver.
  • Habitat: They prefer open habitats such as grasslands, agricultural fields, and roadsides, where they can find suitable perches for hunting and nesting.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Scissor-tailed flycatchers are known for their elaborate courtship displays, which involve aerial acrobatics and vocalizations performed by both males and females.

Black-capped Vireo (Vireo atricapilla)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: A small songbird with olive-green upperparts, a black cap, and white spectacles around the eyes, often found singing from the tops of shrubs and small trees.
  • Behavior: Black-capped vireos feed primarily on insects, foraging in dense foliage by gleaning prey from leaves and branches or by making short sallies to catch flying insects.
  • Habitat: They inhabit shrubby habitats such as oak-juniper woodlands, scrublands, and brushy areas with scattered trees, where they build cup-shaped nests in low vegetation.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Black-capped vireos are known for their distinctive song, a series of repeated phrases often described as a whistled “chick-a-per-wee” or “chick-a-per-ee,” which they use to defend territories and attract mates.

Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Evan Lipton
  • Features: A medium-sized songbird with a distinctive black mask, grayish back, and white underparts, known for its predatory behavior and habit of impaling prey on thorns or barbed wire.
  • Behavior: Loggerhead shrikes hunt by perching in open areas and scanning for prey, which they capture with their sharp, hooked bills before impaling them on thorns or other sharp objects for later consumption.
  • Habitat: They inhabit open grasslands, shrublands, and agricultural areas, where they can find suitable perches for hunting and nesting.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Loggerhead shrikes have a unique hunting behavior known as “lardering,” where they impale prey items such as insects, lizards, or small mammals on thorns, barbed wire, or other sharp objects to store for later consumption.

Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: A small, active bird with a black cap, white cheeks, and grayish upperparts, often found in mixed-species foraging flocks with other small songbirds.
  • Behavior: Carolina chickadees are acrobatic foragers, hopping along branches and probing bark crevices for insects and seeds, often hanging upside down to reach food.
  • Habitat: They inhabit a variety of wooded habitats, including deciduous and mixed forests, parks, and suburban areas, where they can find suitable food and nesting sites.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Carolina chickadees have a complex vocal repertoire, with distinctive calls and songs that vary depending on the situation, including alarm calls to warn of predators and contact calls to communicate with other members of their flock.

Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Ronan Nicholson
  • Features: A small sparrow with grayish-brown plumage, a black bib on the throat, and a distinctive white eyering, often seen foraging on the ground in arid or semi-arid habitats.
  • Behavior: Black-throated sparrows are ground-foraging birds, scratching in leaf litter and soil to find seeds, insects, and small invertebrates, using their sharp bills to probe and capture prey.
  • Habitat: They prefer open, arid habitats such as desert scrub, chaparral, and grasslands with scattered shrubs, where they build cup-shaped nests on the ground or low shrubs.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Black-throated sparrows have a distinctive song, consisting of a series of clear, whistled notes often described as “tseet-tseet-tseet,” which they use to establish and defend territories during the breeding season.

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Kevin Long
  • Features: A small, grayish bird with a pink bill, white belly, and dark hood or bib on the throat and upper breast, often seen foraging on the ground or perching in shrubs and trees.
  • Behavior: Dark-eyed juncos are ground-foraging birds, hopping and scratching in leaf litter to uncover seeds, insects, and other food items, often forming large feeding flocks during the non-breeding season.
  • Habitat: They inhabit a variety of forested habitats, including coniferous and mixed forests, woodlands, and suburban areas, where they can find suitable food and cover.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Dark-eyed juncos are known for their distinctive “trill” call, a musical series of notes often described as “chip-chip-chip” or “tweedle-tweedle-tweedle,” which they use to communicate with other individuals and alert members of their flock to potential threats.

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Robert Tizard
  • Features: A small, stocky songbird with a black and white plumage pattern, yellowish buff underparts, and a distinctive white patch on the back of the head, often seen perched on grass stalks or flying low over open fields.
  • Behavior: Bobolinks are highly migratory birds, traveling thousands of miles between their breeding grounds in North America and their wintering areas in South America, where they feed on seeds and insects in open grasslands and agricultural fields.
  • Habitat: They prefer open grasslands, meadows, and hayfields during the breeding season, where they build their nests on the ground or in dense vegetation to conceal them from predators.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Bobolinks are known for their melodious song, a complex and bubbly mixture of whistles, trills, and warbles often delivered in flight, which they use to attract mates and defend territories during the breeding season.

Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Bryan Calk
  • Features: A small, black-and-white songbird with bold black streaks on the upperparts, white underparts, and a distinctive striped pattern on the head and face, often seen creeping along tree trunks and branches in search of insects.
  • Behavior: Black-and-white warblers are active and agile foragers, probing bark crevices and leaf litter for insects and spiders, using their long, curved bills to extract prey from tight spaces.
  • Habitat: They inhabit a variety of forested habitats, including deciduous and mixed forests, woodlands, and swampy areas with dense vegetation, where they can find suitable food and nesting sites.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Black-and-white warblers are the only members of the wood-warbler family to regularly forage on tree trunks and branches, using their strong legs and feet to cling to vertical surfaces while searching for food.

Blackpoll Warbler (Setophaga striata)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Connor Cochrane
  • Features: A small songbird with black streaks on the upperparts, white underparts, and a distinctive white patch on the wing, often seen flitting and fluttering through the branches of trees and shrubs.
  • Behavior: Blackpoll warblers are long-distance migrants, traveling thousands of miles between their breeding grounds in North America and their wintering areas in South America, where they feed on insects and spiders in forested habitats.
  • Habitat: They breed in northern boreal forests, where they build cup-shaped nests on tree branches or in dense vegetation, and migrate through a variety of habitats, including woodlands, scrublands, and coastal areas.
  • Conservation Status: Near Threatened.
  • Fun Fact: Blackpoll warblers are renowned for their remarkable migration, undertaking one of the longest non-stop flights of any songbird, crossing the Atlantic Ocean from North America to South America in a single journey lasting up to three days.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus)

black-and-white birds in texas
Photo by Lance Runion
  • Features: A medium-sized songbird with black and white plumage on the back and wings, a distinctive rose-red patch on the breast, and white underparts, often seen perched in trees or visiting backyard bird feeders.
  • Behavior: Rose-breasted grosbeaks are omnivorous, feeding on a variety of seeds, fruits, insects, and spiders, using their thick, conical bills to crack open seeds and crush insects.
  • Habitat: They inhabit a variety of wooded habitats, including deciduous and mixed forests, woodlands, and suburban areas with mature trees and shrubs, where they can find suitable food and nesting sites.
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern.
  • Fun Fact: Rose-breasted grosbeaks are highly vocal birds, with a musical song consisting of clear, flute-like whistles often described as “robin-like,” which they use to establish and defend territories during the breeding season.

Threats and Conservation

Black-and-white birds in Texas face various threats, including habitat loss and degradation due to urbanization, agriculture, and energy development. The conversion of grasslands and wetlands into croplands and urban areas reduces available nesting and foraging habitat for many species. Furthermore, collisions with man-made structures such as buildings and communication towers pose significant risks to migratory birds during their long-distance journeys.

Conservation efforts are crucial to mitigate these threats and ensure the survival of black-and-white bird species in Texas. Initiatives such as habitat restoration, land protection, and sustainable land management practices are essential for maintaining and enhancing suitable habitats for these birds. Additionally, raising awareness about the importance of conservation and promoting responsible environmental stewardship among local communities can help support bird populations across the region.

Citizen Science

Citizen science plays a vital role in monitoring bird populations and understanding their ecological needs. Birdwatchers and amateur ornithologists can contribute valuable data to scientific research projects by participating in bird surveys, recording observations, and submitting their findings to online databases such as eBird. By documenting bird sightings and behavior, citizen scientists help researchers track population trends, identify important habitat areas, and inform conservation strategies.

Bird enthusiasts in Texas can get involved in citizen science initiatives by joining local birding groups, participating in bird counts and monitoring programs, and volunteering for conservation organizations. By actively engaging with the natural world and sharing their observations, citizen scientists contribute valuable information that contributes to our understanding of avian ecology and informs conservation efforts to protect black-and-white birds and their habitats.

Conclusion

The black-and-white birds in Texas add beauty and diversity to state’s rich avian fauna, with species such as the ring-necked duck, lesser scaup, and black-and-white warbler contributing to the state’s ecological richness. From the wetlands of the Gulf Coast to the grasslands of the Panhandle, these birds inhabit a variety of habitats and play important roles in local ecosystems.

However, black-and-white birds face numerous threats, including habitat loss, collisions with man-made structures, and climate change. Conservation efforts and citizen science initiatives are essential for protecting these species and their habitats, ensuring that future generations can continue to enjoy the sight and sounds of these iconic birds in Texas and beyond.